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This past week, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), re-instated the blue and yelllow rail service and opened all of the stations along each line. To my commuters who have survied the summer: thank you for your patience. I hope the new facilities are visually appealing as well as safer. As a frequent rider, I am happy to have service back!

 

The following stations have reopened after the platform reconstruction project and updates to metro facilities: Braddock Rd, King Street, Van Dorn St, Franconia-Springfield, Esienhower Ave and Huntington.

 

The 2020 House of Delegates Page Program application has gone LIVE on the “Capitol Classroom” section of the Virginia General Assembly website.  It also will be featured for the next three months there as well as on the scrolling Virginia General Assembly home page highlighting various “news worthy” happenings around Capitol Square.

 

The 2020 House Page application is accessible here - https://capclass.virginiageneralassembly.gov/PagePrograms/PagePrograms.html

We apologize for any inconvenice, but the office phone will be disconnected from Friday, June 7th until Monday, June 24th, 2019. If you need to reach Delegate Sickles, please email DelMSickles@house.virginia.gov or call the Richmond office at (804) 698-1043. Thank you.

The Basics

These six stations will be closed for full platform reconstruction and infrastructure improvements from Saturday, May 25th to Sunday, September 8:

The Project

On June 1, the ramp connecting the HOV lanes and I-395 South, just south of the Pentagon, will close permanently. When traveling from D.C. to Virginia, expect new traffic patterns near the 14th Street Bridge and the Pentagon. This closure will improve safety, as this is the location where the most accidents happen in the I-395 corridor, and improve connectiveity to the Pentagon, Pentagon City and Crystal City.

 

Morning Commute

Gaveled into session on January 10th, the 2018 General Assembly Session is now in full swing. As always on even years, the General Assembly meets for 60 rather than 45 days to consider legislation. Although longer, the even-year session moves just as fast, as legislators plow through many bills and budget amendments.

In light of news in New Orleans, Baltimore, and the Neo-Nazi, white supremacist unpleasantness and murder in Charlottesville, Confederate monuments and their future are even more in the news. In my view, there is only one venue to discuss locally erected monuments and that is in that locality--it is an opportunity for everyone to learn and re-learn our local history. For the most part, that is the law today, although there is ongoing litigation that could change the status quo and prevent the removal of any monument regardless of the context surrounding its erection.

Last month, the widening of the 3.6-mile-long section of Route 1, stretching between Mount Vernon Highway and Telegraph Road was finally completed. This $180 million federally-funded project will not only help eliminate congestion in one of the busiest corridors of the County, but it will also drastically improve public access to Fort Belvoir. The project funding, justified by the addition of the new hospital, was secured by Congressman Jim Moran, adjusting to meet the considerably more complicated rules concerning earmarks.

Last month, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who serves as Vice Chair of President Trump’s Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, requested extensive election data and confidential voter information from all 50 states. Under the guise of investigating “widespread voter fraud” in the 2016 election, the Commission requested a list of all registered voters, their addresses, date of birth, voting histories, political affiliations, and the last four digits of their social security numbers. On a bi-partisan basis, this request has not been received well.

A major problem facing 43rd district residents is the declining use of Metrorail and the consequent increase in single passenger cars on the road. For all those who depend on Metro for their daily commute, and for those like myself who use Metro several times a week, we have a lot at stake in turning WMATA around.

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